Smithland. One of the early settlements in the county was Smithland, on the Little Sioux River, about thirty-five miles southeast of Sioux City. At this place in January 1857, began, between the whites and Indians, the troubles immediately preceding the Spirit Lake massacre. The Indians made some threats against the whites, which caused the settlers to arrest and disarm some of Ink-pa-du-tah’s band. The Indians stole other arms, and passing up the valley of Little Sioux River into Cherokee and Clay Counties, committed further depredations. When they arrived in Dickinson County, they committed the outrages, which form so painful a chapter in the history of the State.

Correctionville. Lies in a bend of the Little Sioux River, near the line of Ida County. It was settled years ago, when Sioux City was little more than an Indian camping ground, and per force of circumstances still remains a village, though its situation and natural resources would warrant it in becoming a town. A pioneer by the name of Shook came into what is now Kedron Township in Section 1, in 1853. R. Candreau, C. Bacon, and M. Kellog came the next year. Shook sold out to Bacon, who was the first permanent settler.

Woodbury. This village was formerly called Sergeant’s Bluff City. The railroad station here is still Called Sergeant’s Bluff. It is situated on the Missouri bottom, six miles south of Sioux City. It was located in 1856, by Doctor J.D.M. Crockwell and Doctor Wright, of Independence, Iowa. In 1857-8 a newspaper was published here, of which mention has been made. In 1862 the manufacture of pottery was commenced at Woodbury, and the business has been lively and remunerative ever since.

Danbury, Salix, and Oto are other minor settlements in Woodbury County.

Source:Woodbury County Iowa, History of Western Iowa, 1882